Posts Tagged ‘upper palatinate’

Hiking the Haselstein and the Center of Central Europe

Tuesday, May 14th, 2019

On this hike I car­ried with me three cam­er­as — maybe I should stay at one per hike only, as weight is always an issue.

The film one was a Con­tax G2 with its Carl Zeiss Biogon 2.8/28mm attached. I loaded a Kodak Ultramax 400. After the second image the cam­era stopped work­ing due to an empty bat­tery. As I had no spare on hand, all the rest was made digit­al only.

The first digit­al one was a Sony A7R2 with a M39 Voigtländer Col­or-Heli­ar 2.5/75mm attached where I loaded again … a pretty cool sensor 😉

The second digit­al one was the beloved Ricoh GR II.

The full album can be seen here on my flickr pages. I made a col­or ver­sion and a black & white ver­sion again.

Images above were made with the Con­tax G2, Carl Zeiss Biogon 2.8/28mm on Kodak Ultramax 400.

Images above were made with the Sony A7R2, Voigtländer Col­or-Heli­ar 2.5/75mm.

Images above were made with the Ricoh GR II.

In case you’d like to com­ment, it’s appre­ci­ated … and maybe, you want to vis­it my web­site or my flickr page too.

So long … and thanks for all the fish.

Hiking the Waldnaabtal

Saturday, March 30th, 2019

On this hike I used two cam­er­as. The film one was a Con­tax G2 with its Carl Zeiss Biogon 2.8/28mm attached. I loaded a Kodak Ultramax 400. The digit­al one was a Sony A7R2 with a M39 Voigtländer Col­or-Heli­ar 2.5/75mm attached. I loaded … a pretty cool sensor 😉

The full album can be seen here on my flickr pages. I made a col­or ver­sion and a black & white ver­sion again.

The Con­tax G2 is a gem … I men­tioned it already in anoth­er post about its sib­ling, the Con­tax G1. Regard­ing the lens … I’m impressed by the sharp­ness.

All images above were made with the Con­tax G2, Carl Zeiss Biogon 2.8/28mm on Kodak Ultramax 400.

The Sony A7R2 … is simply a cool tool which I mainly use with vin­tage glass. The manu­al M39 Voigtländer Col­or-Heli­ar 2.5/75mm is so easy to handle with the focus peak­ing, it’s light­weight, small and deliv­ers a won­der­ful sharp­ness.

All images above were made with the Sony A7R2, Voigtländer Col­or-Heli­ar 2.5/75mm.

In case you’d like to com­ment, it’s appre­ci­ated … and maybe, you want to vis­it my web­site or my flickr page too.

So long … and thanks for all the fish.

 

Contax G1 with a Zeiss Planar 2/45mm

Friday, September 7th, 2018

This time a beau­ti­ful Con­tax G1 found its way to me, accom­pan­ied by three legendary Zeiss lenses. All parts are in good shape, so let’s see what comes out when the first film is pushed through.

On the one side, the Con­tax G-Sys­tem (i.e. the G1 and even more its sib­ling the G2) is said to be the world’s most advanced 35mm rangefind­er cam­era sys­tem. On the oth­er side its said that beside all its mer­its, it has its rough edges too. More on that later 😉

Here are the three stel­lar lenses I meant, start­ing with the Carl Zeiss Biogon 2.8/28mm …

… the Carl Zeiss Planar 2.0/45mm …

Contax Zeiss Planar 2/45mm

… and the Carl Zeiss Son­nar 2.8/90mm.

All three are rated as superb from a wide range of review­ers on the web — all far more exper­i­enced pho­to­graph­ers than I will ever be 😉

But now, film is loaded and on we go — an Agfa Vista 200 will do the job.

The Con­tax G1 body has been reviewed on sev­er­al web-loc­a­tions — just check my web­site to name some — so there is no need to repeat. There are some points which are widely cri­ti­cized — things like a hyper sens­it­ive shut­ter but­ton, a small view­find­er, too slow max­im­um shut­ter speed and an unre­li­able auto­fo­cus — so I’ll have an eye on these.

The first lens I’ll try is the Carl Zeiss Planar 2.0/45mm, which is said to be  one of the best lenses of all times.

Puh, … film is done and in the lab. In the mean­time I can talk about how it went, shoot­ing this combo.

To me, this cam­era is a little gem. It fits in the hand like it was made for … me. Reminds me some­how on its SLR sib­ling — the 159MM. All dials and switches and but­tons are simply where they should be. As I was shoot­ing in aper­ture pri­or­ity mode with auto­fo­cus, the only thing to adjust was the aper­ture.

First point, the max­im­um shut­ter speed of 1/2000s was nev­er an issue.

Shoot­ing ISO 200 film there is plenty of room for adjust­ments for play­ing with depth of field. Using film with ISO 100 or ISO 400 or even ISO 800 makes it easy to work when the envir­on­ment makes it neces­sary. I do not know how some claim this 1/2000s to be an issue — too slow and not fast enough. Dur­ing their time, 1/2000s was not that bad, when most SLR and Rangefind­er offered 1/1000s — and yes I know there were SLR offer­ing 1/4000s already … at least some.

Maybe com­ing from mod­ern DSLR or Mir­ror­less Cam­er­as (I really like this term as it describes an object with its miss­ing fea­ture) with their max­im­um shut­ter speed of 1/4000s or 1/8000s or even elec­tron­ic shut­ter with 1/32000s is some­how chal­len­ging for those old cam­er­as, but really .… it’s nice hav­ing it, but who need this?

Second point, the hyper sens­ible shut­ter but­ton.

When ‘half-pressed’, it trig­gers auto­fo­cus and auto­ex­pos­ure meas­ure­ment. To call this ‘half-pressed’ is some­what funny as you do not really need to ‘press’. I com­pare it more with the shut­ter but­ton of my Min­olta X-700, where a slight touch trig­gers the meas­ure­ment. That’s it.

You get used to it the more you use it. Is this not the same with all things you learn? Learn­ing to ride a bicycle is tricky in the begin­ning, but once you got it, it’s pretty easy for the rest of your life as you know how to keep the bal­ance.

Third point, the auto­fo­cus.

I can remem­ber my Yash­ica T5 which too has a cent­ral auto­fo­cus field only. Not hav­ing the inten­ded object in this focus field gives a missed focus … les­son learned.

Same for my Can­on AF35 MKII. Cent­ral auto­fo­cus field and if you miss your inten­ded object it res­ul­ted in a missed focus … les­son learned. Easi­est to be seen when shoot­ing two people, fram­ing that both are placed well and point­ing the cent­ral focus field in the middle between them. Wow … get’s the back­ground sharp and in focus then.

And yes, if you place ver­tic­al lines in this focus field it helps a lot. So there’s noth­ing spe­cial with it. Learn it and then do it — it’s like rid­ing a bicycle. That the pass­ive auto­fo­cus is not that good in really low light does not bear a big sur­prise. No con­trast, no auto­fo­cus. If you keep this in mind, auto­fo­cus works like always — and it’s fast enough.

If you come from the digit­al age with your DSLR and Mir­ror­less Cam­era car­ry­ing tril­lions of focus points spread over the whole sensor and work­ing with arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence like algorithms to auto detect everything … yes, then you per­haps might get a little bit lost with a single cent­ral focus field.

I learned, that many pro­fes­sion­al pho­to­graph­ers often deac­tiv­ate their auto­de­tect everything auto­fo­cus and use the cent­ral focus field only. Guess why?

Fourth point, a small view­find­er … can we please skip this and go to the next point.

Indeed it’s small — the smal­lest I’ve ever seen, besides some very old cam­er­as like my Zeiss Ikon Ercona II. Once you know how to best look through it (i.e. pos­i­tion your eye), you see all things neces­sary. The info pan­el on the bot­tom, the cent­ral auto­fo­cus field and the full frame (pun inten­ded). Noth­ing more is needed to frame and focus.

Shure, if the view­find­er would be like on a Min­olta Dyn­ax 9 this would be fant­ast­ic (more on that in a later post). But finally it shows what it should and its suc­cessor made it bet­ter with a lar­ger view­find­er — on the G2.

Next point … my con­clu­sion:

If you can find one — get one and enjoy it.

Point one, two, three and four show to me that you do not need to worry using this cam­era. Those were the most cri­ti­cized top­ics and none is a show stop­per. The oppos­ite is the case — this cam­era fells into hand as it was made for and it’s hand­ling is so easy.

Besides all that tech­nic­al stuff, this cam­era is a real beauty — as beau­ti­ful as a cam­era can be. To me, this is a won­der­ful piece of tech­no­logy and worth being used to take pic­tures without any doubt.

In case you’d like to com­ment, it’s appre­ci­ated … and maybe, you want to vis­it my web­site or my flickr page too.

So long … and thanks for all the fish.

P.S. Just to men­tion, the full film can be found on flickr in col­our and in black and white.

Hiking the Burgruine Weissenstein

Wednesday, June 6th, 2018

Between the years we were hik­ing to the Burg Weis­sen­stein in the Upper Palat­in­ates Stone­wood Forest. Dur­ing a snowstorm, in a winter won­der­land, we found the Burg covered by an ice shield. This area is one of my favor­ite hik­ing regions dur­ing all sea­sons.

All images were taken with the highly appre­ci­ated Ricoh GR II. The more I use this cam­era, the more I find it a really won­der­ful cam­era, both, in the res­ult­ing images and in the ease and flex­ib­il­ity of use.

In case you’d like to com­ment, it’s appre­ci­ated … and maybe, you want to check out my web­site too!

Enjoy

P.S. … and don’t for­get my Flickr page.

Contax Aria and Yashica ML 2.8/24mm

Monday, June 4th, 2018

A first film found its way into my Con­tax Aria — an Agfa Vista 400. As lens I used a Yash­ica ML 2.8/24mm. The Con­tax Aria is a beau­ti­ful piece of tech­no­logy and one of the last SLR mod­els from Con­tax.

Tech­nic­al specs can be found here, so there’s no need to duplic­ate them.

And here comes the cor­rect lens …

 

The Aria is the smal­lest and most light­weight Con­tax SLR mod­el. It’s even light­er than the Con­tax 139 or the Con­tax 159. Dials and switches are sim­il­ar to the oth­er pre­de­cessor mod­els like e.g. RX or AX. All are well placed and pure fun to use. Show­ing a size com­par­is­on, just look here.

The lens — a Yash­ica ML 2.8/24mm — is rated not bad, reviews and rat­ings can be found on the web.

To give the combo a little bit room to shine, I took it on a hike in the Upper Palat­in­ate. Hik­ing to the Haarkapelle — not sure if Hair-Chapel is the right trans­la­tion, as it lies near a (very) small vil­lage named Haar and a small ridge called Haar-Rangen. It’s a small chapel in the middle of a forest, built as a remem­brance of a good man. The hike goes along a fair num­ber of ponds and we had a cold but sunny day at late Feb­ru­ary. So all was pre­pared for some nice pic­tures.

The film — an Agfa Vista 400 — is cur­rently in the mak­ing and dm and I expect it to be back in about a week.
Until then, I have made at least some digit­al shots with my lovely Ricoh GR II. Here you go …

START UPDATE
I checked online the status of my film and just got the info that my film is not lis­ted in their order sys­tem … ???
So I went in the dm-shop and told them … they say they sent it out to the lab.
They called the lab which tells they nev­er received that film.
I placed a search request … let’s see …
END UPDATE

The combo worked very well and hand­ling is quite a pleas­ure. The little Aria does not stand in the way and simply works. The Yash­ica gives a beau­ti­ful focal length with it’s 24mm and it’s a joy work­ing with it — a very sol­id con­struc­tion. Did I say, that 24mm is a focal length I like 😉

Let’s see what comes back from the pro­cessor …

START UPDATE
Well, finally after 4 weeks I called them and … my film was back from pro­cessing 🙂
END UPDATE

Using the scanned samples — 1500px — I made some tweeks with Sil­ver­FX and … voila … here they are 😉

What slightly irrit­ates me is, that the 3rd party lens shade was advert­ised for a 24mm lens … and here I have vign­et­ting on all images. What I found fur­ther was, some flares when hav­ing the sun in the image. But I think that’s not so bad for a 24mm lens. All images can be found here.

Enjoy 😉

P.S. In case you’d like to com­ment … it’s appre­ci­ated!
P.P.S. … and maybe, you want to check out my web­site too.
P.P.P.S. … and don’t for­get my Flickr page.

Hiking along the Waldnaab

Thursday, May 31st, 2018

After Christ­mas A.D. 2017, with all its won­der­ful and exhaust­ive meals, we found time to hike along the small river Wald­naab.

Waldnaab / Flutkanal, Ricoh GR II Wald­naab / Flutkanal, Ricoh GR II

This time I col­lec­ted a hand­ful of black&white bark images — made with the Ricoh GR II — from trees lined up along the small river — or bet­ter, along it’s flood chan­nel.

Waldnaab / Flutkanal, Ricoh GR II Wald­naab / Flutkanal, Ricoh GR II

As we were hik­ing this trail already many many times, tak­ing a cam­era with you and per­ceiv­ing the envir­on­ment con­sciously is somet­ing com­pletely dif­fer­ent. See­ing the dif­fer­ing struc­ture of the barks on each tree — where you nor­mally simply pass by — makes each of these trees … unique.

Just to men­tion:
Regard­ing this beau­ti­ful small river, even if the river Wald­naab is a small river by all means, at it’s estu­ary into the river Donau, it’s even wider (not deep­er) than this legendary Ger­man river — as can be con­firmed on Google Maps. River Naab is the beau­ti­ful dark one com­ing from the left, river Donau is the muddy one com­ing from the bot­tom right of the screen­shot.

Screen­shot from Google Maps

My trip to that estu­ary can be found here.

Enjoy 😉

P.S. In case you’d like to com­ment … it’s appre­ci­ated!
P.P.S. … and maybe, you want to check out my web­site too.
P.P.P.S. … and don’t for­get my Flickr page.